Archive for category Dong quai'

Dong quai: Interactions. Pregnancy Use. Practice Points. FAQ

Adverse Reactions Furanocoumarins, such as bergapten and psoralen, which are in dong quai have been widely studied for their phototoxicity; however, only Angelica gigas (Korean angelica) has been demonstrated to cause photodermatitis. Safrole, found in the volatile oil, is a potential carcinogen; however, no specific cases of carcinogenesis have been reported. High doses of dong quai volatile oil have been reported to cause nephrosis in rats but there are no reports in humans. Significant Interactions WARFARIN Case reports suggest the elevations in prothrombin and INR may occur when dong quai is used with warfarin — use caution if used concurrently with warfarin. Contraindications and Precautions Because dong quai may have oestrogenic effects, women with hormone-sensitive tumours, endometriosis and uterine fibroids should avoid using dong quai. Traditional contraindications include diarrhea due to weak digestion, haemor-rhagic disease, heavy periods, first trimester of pregnancy, and acute infection such as colds or flu. Pregnancy Use Dong quai may stimulate uterine contractions and is therefore contraindicated in pregnancy. Practice Points / Patient Counselling • Dong quai is a popular Chinese Read more […]

Dong quai: Uses. Dosage

Clinical Use GYNAECOLOGICAL USE Orally, dong quai has been traditionally used in combination with other herbs for gynaecological ailments including menstrual cramps, irregularity, retarded flow, weakness during the menstrual period, and symptoms of menopause. Very little clinical research has been conducted to determine its effectiveness as sole treatment in these indications. In a 12-week randomised, placebo-controlled trial in 55 postmenopausal women, a combination of dong quai and chamomile was found to significantly reduce hot flushes and improve sleep disturbances and fatigue. Another double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trial of 71 women using dong quai as a single agent (4.5 g/day) found no differences between groups in the number of vasomotor flushes, endometrial thickness, or vaginal cells over a 24-week period. It is suggested that dong quai may have some efficacy for premenstrual syndrome when used in traditional Chinese multi-herbal formulas, and an uncontrolled trial has suggested the possible benefit of uterine irrigation with dong quai extract for infertility due to tubal occlusion. Other Uses In TCM, dong quai is used to strengthen the heart, lung and liver meridians and harmonise Read more […]

Dong quai: Background. Actions

Historical Note Dong quai is an aromatic herb commonly used in TCM. Its reputation is second to that of ginseng and is regarded as a ‘female’ remedy, or women’s ginseng. Used in combination with other herbs, dong quai is used to treat numerous menstrual disorders and menopausal symptoms, as well as abdominal pain, migraine headache, rheumatism and anaemia. Dong quai (Angelica sinensis) is closely related to the European Angelica archangelica, a common garden herb and the flavouring in Benedictine and Chartreuse liqueurs. Common Name Dong quai Other Names Chinese angelica, dang gui, women’s ginseng, tang kuei Botanical Name / Family Angelica sinensis (synonym: Angelica polymorpha sinensis) (family Apiaceae [Umbelliferae] — carrot family) Plant Part Used Root Chemical Components Dong quai contains essential oil (0.4-0.7%) consisting of 45% ligustilide, n-butylphthalide, cadinene, carvacrol, safrole and isosafrol. The root also contains sucrose (40%) and various lactonesand vitamins, together with phytosterols, ferulic acid and coumarins, including osthole, psoralen and bergapten. Ferulic acid and ligustilide are considered to be the main active components and it has been suggested that assessment of total Read more […]