Archive for category Nettle'

Nettle (Urtica dioica)

Nettle: Medical Uses Nettle is used for allergy symptoms and anemia. It also is used to prevent hair loss, stimulate hair growth, promote weight loss, and strengthen the liver. Historical Uses Nettle is the Anglo-Saxon word for “needle.” In folklore, nettle was used as a footbath for rheumatism, a spring tonic, a diuretic, and a remedy for asthma. Growth Nettle grows 2 to 3 feet high and has dark green leaves with stinging hairs. Touching or brushing against the leaves sometimes causes a severe local irritation. Parts Used • Leaves • Roots Major Chemical Compounds • FlavonoidsAcetylcholine • Histamine • Serotonin • Chlorophyll • Carotenoids • High amounts of iron, calcium, vitamin C, and silica. Nettle: Clinical Uses Nettle is used for allergy symptoms and anemia. It also is used to prevent hair loss, stimulate hair growth, promote weight loss, and strengthen the liver. It is used as a nutritive tea for pregnant and breast-feeding women. It can also be used for arthritis pain and for its anti-HIV effects. Mechanism of Action This herb has antihistamine and diuretic effects. It increases production of breast milk. It has antiprostatic, androgenic, keratogenetic, Read more […]

Herb-Drug Interactions: Nettle

Urtica dioica L. (Urticaceae) Synonym(s) and related species Stinging nettle, Urtica. Note that Urtica urens L. has been referred to as Dwarf nettle. Pharmacopoeias Nettle Leaf (British Ph 2009, European Ph 2008); Stinging Nettle (The United States Ph 32). Constituents Nettle root contains sterols including beta-sitosterol, and lignans, such as pinoresinol, secoisolariciresinol, dehydroconiferyl alcohol and neo-olivil. The triterpenes, oleanolic acid and ursolic acid, and their derivatives, and a lectin mixture known as Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) are also present. Root extracts may be standardised to its content of beta-sitosterol, scopoletin and amino acids (The United States Ph 32). The leaves contain flavonoids, mainly kaempferol, isorhamnetin and quercetin glycosides, and caffeic acid derivatives. Extracts may be standardised to caffeoylmalic acid and chlorogenic acid expressed as chlorogenic acid (British Ph 2009, European Ph, 6th ed., 2008 and Supplements 6.1, 6.2, 6.3 and 6.4). Note that histamine, formic acid, acetylcholine, acetic acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine, which form the ‘sting’ when the fresh leaf is touched, are denatured during drying and processing. Use and indications The root Read more […]