Pregnancy Care

Pregnancy Care And Prenatal Wellness The state of a woman’s health is indeed completely tied up with the culture in which she lives and her position in it, as well as in the way she lives her life as an individual. We cannot hope to reclaim our bodily wisdom and inherent ability to create health without first understanding the influence of our society on how we think and care for our bodies. — Dr. Christiane Northrup, obstetrician / gynecologist The past decades have tremendously improved the outcomes of high-risk pregnancies and birth, yet with these improvements have come the ubiquitous presence of technological intervention in nearly all aspects of normal childbearing as well. Yet, the safety and efficacy of the routine use of many interventions is not clear, with a striking lack of an evidence base for many. Nonetheless, the number and frequency of interventions has risen steadily since the 1950s. Since 2003, cesarean section has been the most common hospital surgical procedure performed in the United States, with 1.2 million of these major abdominal surgeries each year, accounting for more than 25% of all US births at a national cost $14.6 billion in total charges. In spite of spending more money and using Read more […]

Botanical Treatment Of Nausea And Vomiting Of Pregnancy And Hyperemesis Gravidarum

According to Borrelli et al., the potential teratogenic effects of drugs administered during the critical embryogenie period of pregnancy drastically limit their use. Because of this, many pregnant women turn to complementary and alternative therapies including vitamins, herbal products, homeopathic preparation, acupressure, and acupuncture. A recent literature survey reports that the most commonly used botanicals for the treatment of morning sickness are ginger, chamomile, peppermint, and raspberry leaf. Only ginger has been subjected to investigation of its safety and efficacy for nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. Botanical Treatment Strategies for nausea and vomiting of pregnancy and Hyperemesis Gravidarum Therapeutic Goal Therapeutic Activity Botanical Name Common Name Reduce nausea and vomiting Antinauseant  Antiemetic Cannabis spp. Marijuana Mentha piperita Peppermint Zingiber officinalis Ginger Relieve stomach cramps Antispasmodic Dioscorea villosa Wild yam Matricaria recutita Chamomile Support digestion / appetite Digestive bitters Ballota nigra Black horehound Taraxacum officinale Dandelion root   The botanical approach to Read more […]

ANTIEMETICS

ANTIEMETICS are used to prevent vomiting. They are thus related to antinauseant drugs which are used to reduce or prevent the feeling of nausea that very often precedes the physical process of vomiting (emesis). Commonly, the terms are used synonymously, though it is usually an antinauseant action that is being sought. The type of antinauseant drugs used, and the likelihood of success, depends on the mechanism and origin of the nauseous sensation, and there are a number of ways it can be triggered. Motion sickness (travel sickness) can often be prevented by taking antinauseant drugs before travelling, e.g. the antihistamines meclozine and dimenhydrinate, and the anticholinergic hyoscine. Probably all these drugs act as central MUSCARINIC CHOLINOCEPTOR ANTAGONISTS. Similar drugs may be used to treat nausea and some other symptoms of labyrinthine disease (where the vestibular balance mechanisms of the inner ear are disturbed, e.g. in Meniere’s disease), though other antinauseant drugs may also be necessary, e.g. cinnarizine or phenothiazine derivatives such as chlorpromazine and prochlorperazine. Steroids, such as dexamethasone and methylprednisolone, are effective antiemetics that work by an undefined mechanism. In view Read more […]

ANTIMIGRAINE DRUGS

ANTIMIGRAINE DRUGS are used to treat migraine attacks, which constitute a specific clinically recognized form of headache. Attacks vary in form, but common characteristics include: throbbing in the head confined to one side only (unilateral headache), nausea and vomiting, and a forewarning of the attack (an aura) consisting of visual disturbances and weakness or numbness of the limbs. Drugs are used to help migraine sufferers (and the related state called ‘cluster headache‘) in two quite distinct ways. One group of drugs is given chronically, and helps to prevent attacks (prophylactic use): such as CALCIUM-CHANNEL BLOCKERS. e.g. nifedipine and verapamil; the β-blockers, e.g. metoprolol, nadolol, propranolol and timolol (see β-ADRENOCEPTOR ANTAGONISTS); and also certain vasoactive drugs, including cyproheptadine and the ergot alkaloid methysergide. All these drugs affect blood vessels. In migraine attacks, cerebral vessels are thought to constrict before an attack, then dilate, causing pain during the attack. A second group of drugs may be used to treat acute attacks, either at the stage of the prewarning aura, or during the attack stage itself; and here speed of administration and subsequent absorption of the Read more […]