Black Nightshade, Terong Meranti, Poison Berry

Solanum nigrum L. (Solanaceae) Solanum nigrum L. is a small herb, up to 1.5 m tall. Leaves are ovate, ovate-oblong, glabrous, hairy, 1-16 cm by 0.25-12 cm. Inflorescence of 2-10 in an extra-axillary cluster, with white or purple corolla and yellow central protrusion. Fruit is globose, black in colour but is green when immature, 0.5 cm in diameter, with many seeds. Origin Native to Southwest Asia, Europe, India and Japan. Phytoconstituents Solanidine, α-, β-, γ-chaconine, desgalactotigonin, α-, β-solamargine, diosgenin, solanadiol, α-, β-, γ-solanines, soladulcidine, solanocapsine, α-, β-solansodamine, solasodine, α-solasonine, tigogenin, tomatidenol, uttronins A and B, uttrosides A and B, solanigroside A-H and others. Traditional Medicinal Uses The stem, leaves and roots are used as a decoction for wounds, tumours and cancerous growths, sores and as an astringent. They are also used as a condiment, stimulant, tonic, for treatment of piles, dysentery, abdominal pain, inflammation of bladder, relief of asthma, bronchitis, coughs, eye ailments, itch, psoriasis, skin diseases, eczema, ulcer, relief of cramps, rheumatism, neuralgia and expulsion of excess fluids. The roots are used as an expectorant. The Read more […]

Round Leaf Chastetree, Beach Vitex

Vitex rotundifolia L. f. (Verbenaceae) Vitex rotundifolia L. f. is an evergreen woody tree, densely covered with short hairs. Leaves are opposite, simple, ovate, broadly oblong-elliptic, 2-5 cm long by 1.5-3 cm wide, rounded or abruptly acute at the base. Inflorescence panicles are at the terminal, densely flowered, 4-7 cm long with purple corolla. Fruits are globose, 5-7 mm. Origin Native to Temperate and Tropical Asia, Australasia and Pacific. Phytoconstituents Rotundifuran, prerotundifuran, vitexilactone, previtexilactone, vitexicarpin, vitricine, vitetrifolins D-G, vitexifolins A-E, isoambreinolide and others. Traditional Medicinal Uses In Malaysia, various parts of the plants are considered panacea for illnesses ranging from headache to tuberculosis. In China, the plant has been used for the treatment of cancer. A poultice of the leaves is used to treat rheumatism, contusions, swollen testicles and as a discutient in sprains. In Indonesia, leaves have been used in medicinal baths, as a tincture or for intestinal complaints. In Papua New Guinea, sap from crushed heated leaves is diluted with water and drunk to relieve headaches. The fruits are used to expel worms and in Vietnam, a decoction of dried fruits Read more […]

Feverfew (Tanacetum Parthenium)

Clinical Uses Feverfew is used to prevent and treat migraine headaches. Historical Uses Traditionally, feverfew was used to manage labor pains, to reduce fevers, and to repel insects. Growth Feverfew is a member of the daisy family and may be grown in herb gardens in the spring. The plant prefers dry soil and sun. Feverfew: Part Used • Leaves Major Chemical Compounds • Sesquiterpene lactones, primarily parthenolide Feverfew: Clinical Uses Feverfew is used to prevent migraine headaches and also to treat migraine headaches. Mechanism of Action The mechanism by which feverfew works is not fully understood. It may act like non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) by interfering with the first step of thromboxane synthesis (inhibiting prostaglandin biosynthesis), but it differs from salicylates in that it does not inhibit cyclo-oxygenation by prostaglandin synthase. Feverfew inhibits serotonin release from platelets and polymor-phonuclear leukocyte granules, which benefits patients with migraines or arthritis (The Lawrence Review of Natural Products, 1994). It has shown antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in animals. Feverfew: Dosage To be effective at preventing migraines, the parthenolide Read more […]

Cayenne Pepper (Capsicum Annuum)

Medical Uses Cayenne pepper (capsaicin) is used for peptic ulcer disease, neuralgias, and herpes zoster. Historical Uses Cayenne pepper (capsaicin) was first used medicinally by a physician during Columbus’s voyage. Crowth This mildly pungent plant may be either annual or biennial. Its dark green fruits turn red when ripe. Cayenne Pepper: Part Used • Fruit Major Chemical Compounds • Capsaicinoids, including capsaicin • Vitamins A, C, and E Cayenne Pepper: Clinical Uses Cayenne pepper is used for neuralgias and herpes zoster and is effective in the treatment of peptic ulcer. It is approved by the German Commission E for “painful muscle spasms of the shoulder, arm, and spine in adults and children”. It has been shown to be useful for swallowing difficulty in acute tonsillitis. Mechanism of Action Capsaicin draws blood to the gastrointestinal tract for rapid healing. It also stops Substance P in the pain cycle. Capsicum species contain antinociceptive substances, which help to relieve chronic pain. Cayenne Pepper: Dosage External use: 1/2 ounce of cayenne powder added to 1 quart of rubbing alcohol for muscle aches; applied as a poultice. Ointment or cream: Preparations of .02 to .05 percent Read more […]

Horehound, White (Marrubium vulgare)

Horehound: Medical Uses Traditional use has been for bronchitis and respiratory illness with a nonproductive cough. Historical Uses In folk medicine, horehound has been used primarily for expelling worms; stimulating menses; and treating cough (horehound drops), dog bites, and fevers. In Egypt, horehound was known as “Eye of the Star”. Growth A member of the mint family, horehound has hairy leaves and stems. It grows in the United States and Europe and likes sandy soil, warmth, and sun. It can be planted by seed or cuttings. Harvest horehound leaves to about 4 inches above the ground before flowering. Parts Used • Dried leaves • Flowering tops Major Chemical Compounds • Marrubin • Bitters • Mucilage • Tannins Horehound: Clinical Uses Traditional use has been for bronchitis and respiratory illness with a nonproductive cough. Horehound also may have a hypoglycemic effect. It has been approved by the German Commission E for “loss of appetite, bloating and flatulence”. Mechanism of Action This herb’s bitterness aids digestion. It also exerts expectorant, antispasmodic, and antinociceptive (decreasing painful stimuli) effects by an unknown mechanism, but it is not known if horehound Read more […]

Botanical Treatment Of Chronic Pelvic Pain

Effective botanical treatment of chronic pelvic pain requires a clear understanding of possible etiologies and the appropriate treatment of the underlying cause of the pain. For patients with diagnosed gynecologic conditions associated with pelvic pain, readers are referred to the relevant chapters in this textbook, such as, dysmenorrhea, interstitial cystitis, uterine fibroids, endometriosis, and so forth. Treatments discussed in the following may be used as adjunct palliative therapies for pain, inflammation, and concomitant symptoms in these conditions. In the absence of a clearly identified pathology, the practitioner can approach treatment symptomatically via specific botanical treatments for pain reduction, and attempt to address mechanisms that may be associated with CPP, for example, inflammation. One theory of chronic pelvic pain that was popular among physicians in the early-and mid-twentieth century, and that is still considered a possibility, is that of pelvic congestion syndrome. Women with this syndrome, which is poorly defined, are thought to exhibit many of the symptoms associated with CPP, including aching and dragging sensations in the lower back, lower abdomen, and pelvis, dysmenorrhea, and dyspareunia. Read more […]

Endometriosis: Anti-Inflammatories and Antioxidants

Inflammation is a hallmark of endometriosis, and as discussed, free radical damage may be part of the etiology of this disorder. It has been suggested that growth factors and inflammatory mediators produced by activated peritoneal leukocytes participate in the pathogenesis of endometriosis by facilitating endometrial cells growth at ectopic sites. Elevated levels of inflammatory cells and mediators such as peritoneal macrophages, prostaglandins, proteolytic enzymes, complement fragments, IL-1, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) have been identified in the peritoneal fluid of patients with endometriosis. Numerous herbs that have been used traditionally for inflammatory types of conditions demonstrate significant anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects and should be considered for use in formulations for treatment and symptomatic relief, along with herbs whose use for inflammation is only recently being discovered. These are discussed in the following. Dong Quai Dong quai has antispasmodic, analgesic, and tonic effects, and has demonstrated significant antioxidant and free radical scavenging actions, partially through inhibition of anion radical formation. Limited animal and in vitro studies have reported Read more […]

Herb-Drug Interactions: Cannabis

Cannabis sativa L. (Cannabaceae) Synonym(s) and related species Bhang, Dagga, Ganja, Hashish, Indian hemp, Marihuana, Marijuana. Cannabis indica Lam. Constituents Cannabis herb contains a wide range of cannabinoids, which are the major active compounds. The main psychoactive constituent is delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; dronabinol), and it is the cause of many of the pharmacological effects elicited by the consumption of cannabis. However, other cannabinoids, which do not possess psychoactive properties, such as cannabidiol, cannabinol (a decomposition product of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol), cannabigerol and cannabichromene, are increasingly being investigated for their pharmacological and therapeutic properties. Cannabinoids are often found in the plant as their acid metabolites, e.g. ll-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol acid and others, especially if the plant has been grown in a cooler climate. These decarboxylate to the parent cannabinoid at high temperatures, such as during smoking. Most medicinal cannabis products have been heat treated to ensure that the cannabinoids are present only in the non-acid form. Use and indications Cannabis has no current established use in herbal Read more […]

Fenugreek: Interactions. Contraindications. Pregnancy Use. Practice Points. FAQ

Toxicity Safety studies indicate that fenugreek is extremely safe. When consumed as 20% of the diet, it did not produce toxic effects in animal tests. Adverse Reactions One clinical study found that a dose of 50 g taken twice daily produced mild gastrointestinal symptoms, such as diarrhea and flatulence, which subsided after 3-4 days. Allergic reactions have been reported, but are rare. Significant Interactions Where controlled studies are not available, interactions are speculative and based on evidence of pharmacological activity and case reports. HYPOGLYCAEMIC AGENTS Additive effects are theoretically possible in diabetes — monitor concomitant use and monitor serum glucose levels closely — potentially beneficial interaction. IRON Frequent use of fenugreek can inhibit iron absorption — separate doses by 2 hours. WARFARIN Although there is a theoretical concern that concomitant use could increase bleeding risk due to the herb’s coumarin content, this is unlikely. A placebo-controlled study found that fenugreek does not affect platelet aggregation, fibrinolytic activity or fibrinogen. Contraindications and Precautions Fenugreek is contraindicated in people with allergy to the herb, which has been Read more […]

Fenugreek: Uses. Dosage

Clinical Use DYSPEPSIA AND LOSS OF APPETITE Although controlled studies are unavailable, the increased activity of pancreatic and intestinal lipase seen in animal studies provides a theoretical basis for its use in dyspepsia. Commission E approved the internal use of fenugreek seed for loss of appetite. ELEVATED LIPID LEVELS Several clinical studies conducted in people with and without diabetes have identified significant lipid-lowering activity with different fenugreek preparations, such as defatted fenugreek, germinated seed and hydro-alcoholic extracts. As can be expected, the dose used and type of preparation tested has an influence over results. An open study using a daily dose of 18.0 g germinated fenugreek seed in healthy volunteers demonstrated significant reductions in total cholesterol and LDL-choles-terol levels. A placebo-controlled study found no effect after 3 months with a lower dose of 5 g seed daily, suggesting that higher intakes may be required for lipid-lowering activity to become significant. DIABETES Fenugreek is a popular natural treatment used to aid blood sugar regulation in diabetes. Overall, results from clinical studies have produced positive results however trials have used diverse Read more […]