Ginger: Uses

Clinical Use Although ginger is used in many forms, including fresh ginger used in cooking or chai (Indian spicy tea), pickled or glazed ginger, ethanol extracts and concentrated powdered extracts, preparations made with the root are used medicinally. Depending on the specific solvent used, the resultant preparation will contain different concentrations of the active constituents and may differ markedly from crude ginger. Although the great majority of research refers specifically to the species Zingiber officinale, there is the potential for confusion with other species or even with other genera. Furthermore, there are reported to be wide variations in the quality of commercial ginger supplements with concentrations of gingerols ranging from 0.0 to 9.43 mg/g. As such, the results of specific research can not necessarily be extrapolated to different preparations. PREVENTION OF NAUSEA AND VOMITING Many clinical studies have investigated the effects of ginger in the prevention and treatment of nausea and vomiting associated with different circumstances, including pregnancy, the postoperative period, motion sickness and chemotherapy. A recent systematic review of 24 RCTs covering 1073 patients suggest that results Read more […]

ANTIEMETICS

ANTIEMETICS are used to prevent vomiting. They are thus related to antinauseant drugs which are used to reduce or prevent the feeling of nausea that very often precedes the physical process of vomiting (emesis). Commonly, the terms are used synonymously, though it is usually an antinauseant action that is being sought. The type of antinauseant drugs used, and the likelihood of success, depends on the mechanism and origin of the nauseous sensation, and there are a number of ways it can be triggered. Motion sickness (travel sickness) can often be prevented by taking antinauseant drugs before travelling, e.g. the antihistamines meclozine and dimenhydrinate, and the anticholinergic hyoscine. Probably all these drugs act as central MUSCARINIC CHOLINOCEPTOR ANTAGONISTS. Similar drugs may be used to treat nausea and some other symptoms of labyrinthine disease (where the vestibular balance mechanisms of the inner ear are disturbed, e.g. in Meniere’s disease), though other antinauseant drugs may also be necessary, e.g. cinnarizine or phenothiazine derivatives such as chlorpromazine and prochlorperazine. Steroids, such as dexamethasone and methylprednisolone, are effective antiemetics that work by an undefined mechanism. In view Read more […]