Ruta graveolens

Ruta graveolens L. (Rutaceae) Herb of Grace, Common Rue Ruta graveolens L. is a glabrous herb with stem that can grow up to 14-45 cm. Lower leaves are more or less long-petiolate with ultimate segments 2-9 mm wide, lanceolate to narrowly oblong. Inflorescence is rather lax; pedicels are as long as or longer than the capsule; bracts are lanceolate, leaf-like. Sepals are lanceolate and acute. Petals are oblong-ovate, denticulate and undulate. Capsule is glabrous; segments somewhat narrowed above to an obtuse apex. Origin Native to Europe. Phytoconstituents Rutoside, rutaverine, arborinine, rutin, elemol, pregei-jerene, geijerene, furocoumarins, bergapten, xanthotoxin, fagarine, graveolinine and others. Traditional Medicinal Uses It is frequently used to treat worm and parasitic infection. It has been commonly used for the treatment of psoriasis and vitiligo due to the psoralens and methoxypsoralens present. It is also used to relieve muscle spasms, as carminative, emmenagogue, haemostat, uter-onic, vermifuge, to treat hepatitis, dyspepsia, diarrhoea, bug bite, cancer, cold, fever, snakebite, earache, toothache and as an antidote especially in malarial poisoning. It is also used as an abortifacient to terminate Read more […]

Rue

Ruta graveolens The genus includes six species found in Europe. The Flora of Turkey gives two Ruta species, not including Ruta graveolens. Ruta graveolens L. is a native of southeastern Europe but is widely naturalized in southern Europe and cultivated worldwide. It is a shrubby perennial with a distinctive smell. Smooth erect stems (14-45 cm) bear alternate, stalked bluish-grey-green pinnate leaves with deeply lobed obovate leaflets. Shiny yellow flowers with four spoon-shaped petals occur in terminal umbel-like groups in June-August. A smooth green capsule containing many seeds develops in each flower while other flowers around are still coming into flower. Other species used Ruta angustifolia Pers. and Ruta chalepensis L. are found in southern Europe and are similar but with fringed cilia on the petal edge. Quality All Ruta species are associated with phytophotodermatitis (see below) and plants should not be touched with bare hands, especially on sunny days. Rue is included among the plants discussed in this book not because we ourselves use it, but because of its reputation as a great healing medicine in the Western herbal tradition and the suspicion that it is a neglected remedy. Its application extends Read more […]

Iron: Significant Interactions

Iron interacts with a variety of foods, herbs and drugs through several different mechanisms. Most commonly, the formation of insoluble complexes occurs whereby both iron and drug absorption is hindered. Separation of doses by several hours will often reduce the severity of this type of interaction. Additionally, substances that alter gastric pH have the theoretical ability to reduce iron absorption. A summary of interactions has been presented in table form for easy reference. Drug / therapeutic substance Mechanism Possible outcome Action required ACE inhibitors Reduced absorption of ACE inhibitors. A small clinical trial found that concomitant iron administration reduced area-under-the-curve plasma levels of unconjugated captopril by 37% Reduced drug effect Separate doses by at least 2 hours Antacids and products containing aluminium, calcium or magnesium Reduces iron absorption Reduced effect of iron Separate doses by at least 2 hours Ascorbic acid Increases iron absorption Increased effects of iron Beneficial interaction possible — caution in haemochromatosis Cholestyramineand colestipol In vitro investigations have shown that cholestyramineand colestipol Read more […]