Traditional Uses of Neem

The therapeutic efficacy of neem must have been known to man since antiquity as a result of constant experimentation with nature. Ancient man observed the unique features of this tree: a bitter taste, non-poisonous to man, but deleterious to lower forms of life. This might have resulted in its use as a medicine in various cultures, particularly in the Indian subcontinent and later on in other parts of the world. Ayurveda The word neem is derived from Sanskrit Nimba, which means “to bestow health”; the various Sanskrit synonyms of neem signify the pharmacological and therapeutic effects of the tree. It has been nicknamed Neta — a leader of medicinal plants, Pichumarda — antileprotic, Ravisambba — sun ray-like effects in providing health, Arishta — resistant to insects, Sbeetal — cooling (cools the human system by giving relief in diseases caused by hotness, such as skin diseases and fevers), and Krimighana — anthelmintic. It was considered light in digestion, hot in effect, cold in property. In earlier times, patients with incurable diseases were advised to make neem their way of life. They were to spend most of the day under the shade of this tree. They were to drink infusions of various parts of Read more […]

Historical review of the use of lavender

The classical physicians Lavender has been used as a healing plant and was first mentioned by Dioscorides (c. 40—90 AD) who found what was probably Lavandula stoechas growing on the islands of Stoechades (now known as Hyeres); this was used in Roman communal baths. Dioscorides attributed to the plant some laxative and invigorating properties and advised its use in a tea-like preparation for chest complaints. The author also recounts that Galen (129—99 ad) added lavender to his list of ancient antidotes for poison and bites and thus Nero’s physician used it in anti-poison pills and for uterine disorders. Lavender in wine was taken for snake bites stings, stomach aches, liver, renal and gall disorders, jaundice and dropsy. Pliny differentiated between Lavandula stoechas and Lavandula vera, the latter was apparently used only for diluting expensive perfumes. Pliny the Elder advocated lavender for bereavement as well as promoting menstruation. Abbess Hildegard The Abbess Hildegard (1098—1179) of Bingen near the Rhine in what is now Germany, was the first person in the Middle Ages to clearly distinguish between Lavandula vera and Lavandula spica (): On Palsy one who is tormented should take galangale, with Read more […]

Traditional Medicine for Memory Enhancement

Keywords • Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors • Alzheimer’s disease • Anti-inflammatory • Antioxidant • Estrogenic • Memory • Traditional medicine In traditional practices of medicine, numerous plants have been used to alleviate memory impairment both in healthy individuals and those with disease states which are now recognised as specific cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. An ethnopharmacological approach has provided leads to identify plants and their compounds that may have potential to modulate cognitive abilities by different modes of action. A variety of therapeutic targets have been identified as relevant in the treatment of cognitive disorders, including modulation of the cholinergic system, which may be achieved by the inhibition of acetyl-cholinesterase, and neuroprotection against glutamate-induced overstimulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, by the use of NMDA receptor modulators. Other activities considered to be relevant in the alleviation of cognitive impairment include anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and estrogenic activities. Two of the currently licensed drugs used to treat cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer’s disease, galantamine and rivastigmine, Read more […]