Garlic: Uses

Clinical Use Most studies have used a non-enteric coated dehydrated garlic powder preparation standardised to 1.3% alliin content (Kwai, Lichtwer Pharma) or an aged garlic extract (Kyolic, Wakunaga of America). CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Epidemiologic studies show an inverse correlation between garlic consumption and progression of CVD in general. This review will consider the evidence for garlic in the management of specific risk factors such as hypertension and hyperlipidaemia. Additionally, investigation into the effects of garlic directly on the atherosclerotic and arteriosclerotic processes is presented. Hypertension A meta-analysis of seven clinical trials using a garlic preparation, produced commercially as Kwai, found that three showed a significant reduction in SBP and four in DBP. Kwai was used in these studies in the dosage of 600-900 mg daily. Garlic treatment resulted in a mean reduction in SBP of 7.7 mmHg and 5.0 mmHg in DBP compared with placebo. In 2000, the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality analysed results from 27 randomised, placebo-controlled trials and reported that results were mixed. When significant reductions in blood pressure were observed, these were small. Several newer Read more […]

ANTIFUNGAL AGENTS

ANTIFUNGAL AGENTS are antimicrobial drugs used to treat infections caused by fungal microorganisms. They may be antibiotics produced naturally, or purely synthetic. Fungal infections are not usually a major problem in healthy, well-nourished individuals. But, superficial, localized infections, such as thrush (caused by Candida albicans), and athlete’s foot and ringworm (caused by Tinea fungi of the dermatomycoses group), are common. These can readily be treated with topical application of antifungals. Severe infections occur most frequently where the host’s immunity is low, e.g. following immunosuppression for transplant surgery or in AIDS. Unfortunately, the most potent antifungal drugs taken systemically tend to be toxic. Amphotericin is a complex amphoteric polyene ANTIBIOTIC that binds to cell membranes and forms a pore through which ions can pass, with consequences that include loss of potassium ions from within the cell. Since the antibiotic binds more readily to fungal cell membranes than mammalian, its action is relatively selective. It can potentiate the action of certain other antifungals, and it may be used with flucytosine. Also, it confers antifungal activity on rifampicin (normally antibacterial). As Read more […]